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All Saints Church, Ladbroke

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All Saints Church, Ladbroke

Postby Bruce Everiss » Wed 14 May 2008 12:43 pm

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Ladbroke Village Website: http://ladbroke-pc.gov.uk/index.php/church

"The church building is Grade I listed, dating from the 12th century with many later additions and alterations.
Regular services
First Sunday in the month 10.30 am Family Communion
Other Sundays 9.00 am Holy Communion"

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A History of the County of Warwick: Volume 6 (1951)

Church
The church of ALL SAINTS stands on the west side of the Coventry-Banbury road, in the centre of a small churchyard with three large yew trees on the south side and entered by a lych-gate erected in 1884. The 13th-century church, which probably consisted of a chancel and nave, was entirely rebuilt in the 14th-century with north and south aisles and west tower. All that remains of the earlier church is the lower portion of the chancel. Late in the 15th century the nave and chancel were raised and clearstory windows inserted. It was restored and reroofed in 1876 by Sir Gilbert Scott.
The east wall of the chancel is built of small limestone rubble, with brown sandstone dressings, and has a plinth of two splays and low angle buttresses with gabled heads. Above the sill level the wall has been rendered with cement and the gable rebuilt with red bricks faced with cement; a projecting splay shows the line of the 16th-century roof. The window has three pointed lights under a pointed arch of two splayed orders dying out on splayed jambs, and a hoodmoulding with head stops. The south side has a central buttress, probably added when the clearstory was built. There are three windows to the clearstory, each of three pointed cinquefoil lights, set in deep splays with flat heads. Below there is a similar window to the east, and to the west a modern window of three trefoil lights with a label. On the west side of the buttress there is a narrow doorway with an ogee head under a stopchamfered segmental arch. The wall west of the buttress has been refaced, omitting the plinth. The north side has three clearstory windows corresponding with those on the south, with an offset at sill level formed by the original wall-head. The wall between these windows has been rendered with cement. Below, on either side of the buttress, there are twin lancet windows of one splay and a rectangular low-side window underneath the most westerly light.
The south aisle has been extensively refaced with a mixture of roughly coursed limestone interspersed with squared blocks of brown sandstone and has a plinth of two splays and a buttress at each end. The south wall is lighted by a window of three ogee-headed trefoil lights of two splayed orders, with cusped spandrels, a flat head and label-moulding to the east, and by a similar one of two lights, to the west. Between these windows is the porch, which has been almost entirely rebuilt, the front of ashlar, the sides of coursed rubble, with modern stone seats on either side. The entrance has a pointed arch with continuous mouldings and a hood-mould with return ends. In the apex of the gable there is an incised stone sundial dated 1611, with a carved head corbel built in immediately below, and inside the porch large 14th-century carved head corbels have been built into the wall, two on each side. (fn. 69a) The doorway, which is modern except for the two lower courses of the jambs, has a pointed arch of one continuous splay. The east wall has been partly refaced and the plinth omitted; it has a modern two-light window with a flat head and a label with return ends. The west side has a window of three trefoil lights with a hollow-splayed four-centred arch. The lean-to roof is covered with lead and the clearstory has three windows of two trefoil lights set in deep splays with flat heads. The north aisle and clearstory are similar, but without a porch and the doorway is blocked. The west wall has been refaced and the plinth omitted. On the east wall there are traces of the line of the original steep-pitched chancel roof.
The tower is built of alternate bands of white limestone and brown sandstone with a plinth of three splays; it is not divided by string-courses, but has a weathered offset at the sill level of the belfry window. There are buttresses to the angles, those on the west being diagonal. They rise in five weathered stages, the lower stages having trefoiled gablets with grotesque head-stops, and terminate in pinnacles at each corner of an embattled parapet. The tower is crowned with a tall, slender, octagonal spire having a floriated finial and weather-cock. At the base and midway there are canopied spire lights of two trefoil lights with pointed arches, quatrefoil piercings, crockets to the gables, with head-stops, and terminating in poppy heads. On the west side, in the lower stage, is a window of two trefoil lights and tracery with a pointed arch of two orders, the inner a splay and the outer a shallow wavemoulding, and finished with a hood-mould and headstops. The belfry windows are of a similar type. In the string-course at the base of the parapet there are two gargoyles on each face. On the south side there are two loop-lights to the tower staircase, and a rectangular light to the ringing-chamber, with a clock dial above.
The chancel (32 ft. 3 in. by 18 ft.) has a modern tiled floor with two steps to the altar, plastered walls, and a modern low-pitched roof with moulded tiebeams, purlins, and wall-plates of early-16th-century date. The east window has splayed reveals with a segmental-pointed rear-arch. On the south the clearstory windows have splayed reveals with flat heads, and, below, the eastern window is similar. The modern window to the west is inserted in an earlier recess with a stop-chamfered segmental arch. Between these windows the narrow doorway has a plain ogee head. At the east end there are sedilia with three seats, having moulded cinquefoil ogee heads with crockets, poppy-head finials and head-stops over the moulded mullions dividing the seats; it is entirely a modern restoration except for the two mullions. In the centre there is a wall monument of white marble with coloured marble pilasters supporting an interrupted pediment, with a coat of arms to William Palmer, lord of the manor, died 1720, and his wife Mary, died 1729. In the east clearstory window there are three panels of late-15th-century stained glass representing St. Cuthbert with the head of St. Oswald, St. Chad, and St. Giles with his hind. All the remaining glass is modern. On the north the clearstory corresponds with the south. The window to the east has wide-splayed jambs with a segmental-pointed arch embracing the two lancet windows, below is a badly mutilated recess 3 ft. wide with a moulded pointed arch and traces of a carved gable flanked by pinnacles, which may be an Easter Sepulchre. The window to the west is similar to the one to the east, but the recess is carried down to include the low-side window. The organ is placed between these two windows.
The nave (46 ft. 4 in. by 15 ft. 2 in.) has a modern tiled floor and open trussed rafter roof, and the walls are plastered. The clearstory windows on the south have splayed jambs with modern flat-shouldered rear-arches, and on the north splayed jambs with square heads. Both arcades are of three bays with pointed arches of two splayed orders supported on octagonal pillars with moulded capitals and bases of one splay. The responds repeat the orders of the arches with similar moulded capitals. The chancel arch follows the arcade in detail, but the springing is at a slightly higher level. The tower arch has widely splayed jambs with a pointed arch of four splayed orders on the nave side, the inner going down to the floor and the remainder dying out on the splayed jambs; the tower side has three splayed orders dying out on the tower walls. Above this arch is the line of the earlier roof. The pulpit, placed on the north side of the chancel arch, is a modern octagonal one with traceried panels on a stone base. Opposite the south door there is an early-17th-century wooden chest, bound with iron straps with two locks, a centre hasp, and two additional hasps fitted later.
The south aisle (43 ft. 7 in. by 9 ft. 2 in.) has a tiled floor, plastered walls, and a modern lean-to roof. The 15th-century windows are inserted in 14th-century recesses with widely splayed jambs and chamfered segmental rear-arches. The west window, which is a late-15th-century insertion, has a four-centred reararch. In the south wall there is a modern tomb recess with a chamfered segmental arch, built to accommodate an effigy of a priest in vestments, with his hands clasped in prayer, which was found under the floor of the chancel during the 1876 restoration; it is reputed to be John de Pavely, rector of Ladbroke (1298–1303) but is probably later. The font, placed near the south door, is modern.
The north aisle has similar window recesses, floors, and roof as the south aisle. The blocked north door has a chamfered segmental rear-arch.
The tower (11 ft. 6 in. by 8 ft. 11 in.) is paved with memorial slabs, one a large slate slab to Edward Rayney, with a coat of arms, who died 1699. In the north wall there is an aumbry with an ogee head and two 18th-century mural tablets. The window has a deep, square recess with a head consisting of a series of four plain pointed arches. The south-west angle is splayed for the circular tower staircase and has a narrow door with an ogee head. A modern traceried screen has been placed across the tower arch to form a vestry.
The five bells were recast by J. Taylor & Co. 1873. (fn. 70)
The registers begin in 1559.

From: 'Parishes: Ladbroke', A History of the County of Warwick: Volume 6: Knightlow hundred (1951), pp. 143-147. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report ... mpid=57114. Date accessed: 14 May 2008.
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Bruce Everiss
 
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