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Here comes our local windfarm

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Re: Here comes our local windfarm

Postby Bruce Everiss » Sat 1 Aug 2009 4:07 pm

There is a similar small windfarm (Parc Eolic es Mila) just outside Mahon in Menorca, a fairly big town. It looks great, provides carbon free energy and causes no problems. The people are proud of it as it was the first in the Balearics.

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Re: Here comes our local windfarm

Postby griff76 » Wed 5 Aug 2009 5:26 pm

Wind Farms

we recently went on holiday to Skegness in Lincolnshire, they have several wind farms including some just off the cost that really do look imposing and can be seen for miles around, bit of a shock seeing them so close to the beach though and we think they are great, we asked a local shop owner what his thoughts where and he said they were the best thing to ever happen, their electricity is cheaper and the view was much more pleasing than huge power station that could have been sited there, the farmers still use the field around the turbines too.

Although they are large and you can see them from miles away, bring them to Warwickshire, no one will moan once they realize the good they will do for the environment and the economy. Would people rather have the huge, imposing, not very environmentally friendly nuclear power station on their door step? or Environmentally friendly wind turbines? i know which i would rather see!
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Re: Here comes our local windfarm

Postby Bruce Everiss » Sat 15 Aug 2009 7:28 am

So the NIBYs have got themselves organised, their group is the catchily named FRAWT (Feldon Residents and Windfarm Turbines)
And they have a website: http://frawtwarks.ning.com/

And in Daily Mail sensationalist style they have created this totally improbable picture to scare the children with:

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To which the MD of Broadview said: "The size is grossly exaggerated and the turbines are so close together the blades would smash into one another.”

Here is a more realistic picture of what it will be like:

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Re: Here comes our local windfarm

Postby Bruce Everiss » Sat 15 Aug 2009 7:42 am

The reason they want to build this wind farm is to provide electricity for 33,000 homes.

One can only assume that thew protest group don't actually use any electricity at all and that is why they are against it. Because, obviously it would be morally wrong for them to use electricity made in someone else's neighbourhood.

When electricity is transmitted some of it is lost. Currently about 7% in the UK. Which is a huge amount of energy to just lose, especially in these days of climate change. This is why they want to bring the power generation closer to the power usage with small farms like this proposal and thus reduce transmission losses.

more info here: http://www.ofgem.gov.uk/NETWORKS/ELECDI ... losses.pdf

The site is a good one because it is not near enough to anyone to cause any problems. Here it is:

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Re: Here comes our local windfarm

Postby Bruce Everiss » Sat 15 Aug 2009 7:54 am

The problem we have in the UK is that due to the ineptitude of the current maladministration we are about to run out of electricity!
So we desperately need all the new generation capacity we can get.

Here is an economist article explaining the problem. Editorial: http://www.economist.com/opinion/displa ... d=14167834

Full article: http://www.economist.com/world/britain/ ... d=14177328

With this great quote: "..............History is not reassuring: a combination of nimbyism and poorly-designed state subsidies means that Britain’s previous, less-ambitious renewable targets have all been missed............."

And this graph which illustrates the problem perfectly.

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So if the good people of FRAWT had any social resposibilty they would want the planning and building of this wind farm to be speeded up. The country deperately needs the electricity.
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Re: Here comes our local windfarm

Postby Bruce Everiss » Sat 15 Aug 2009 8:09 am

Wind farm noise information: http://www.noisenet.org/Noise_Enviro_Wind_Farms.htm

The most widely accepted document for wind farm noise assessment is "THE ASSESSMENT AND RATING OF NOISE FROM WIND FARMS" - ETSU-R-97 September 1996, published by the UK's Department of Trade and Industry [DTI]. This document is recommended for the assessment of wind turbine noise in PPS 22 "Renewable Energy".

Summarising, the ETSU "method" is to

1.

Measure the background noise level in terms of LA90,10 min., at nearby properties during the quiet daytime and nighttime periods. Data from the main "working" part of the week is excluded
2.

Plot the LA90 measurements against simultaneous wind speed measurements made at the proposed wind farm; perform a regression analysis to produce a single line of wind speed versus background noise level. This procedure is performed separately for the quiet daytime periods and for the nighttime.
3.

The calculated level of wind farm noise [LA90,10 min.] is then compared against the measured background noise level, at any given wind speed, i.e. the wind turbine predicted levels for a wind speed of say 8 m/s are compared against the background noise level measured when the wind speed is 8 m/s.
4.

The wind farm noise [LA90] is permitted to be 5 dB above the regression line for background noise [LA90]. For example at a given wind speed the background level may be 38 LA90, then the permitted wind farm noise level at that wind speed would be 43 LA90.
5.

However, the lowest nighttime limit for wind farm noise is set at 43 LA90, similarly for the quiet daytime period, the noise limit is not set lower than 35 LA90 [possibly 40 LA90]. For example if the nighttime background noise level at a given wind speed was say 20 LA90, the permissible wind farm noise limit would have been 25 LA90 [20+5]; however, because of the above "cutoffs" the permissible level is in fact set at 43 LA90.
6.

Allowance is made for tonal noise following the recommendations of an International Standard.

This method of assessment is broadly based on BS.4142. The recommendations for nighttime noise are based on the World Heath Organisation Criteria 12 - Noise.

It should be noted that there is provision within ETSU-R-97 for a simplified assessment based on predictions alone if the turbine "...noise is limited to an LA90,10min of 35 dB(A) up to wind speeds of 10 m/s at 10m height." The ETSU document considers that compliance with this condition alone would offer sufficient protection of amenity and background noise surveys would be unnecessary.
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Re: Here comes our local windfarm

Postby Bruce Everiss » Sat 15 Aug 2009 8:16 am

The global wind energy industry has launched a new public awareness campaign called “Wind Power Works… Pass it on” which aims to catalyze wide spread support for wind energy and call on policy makers to commit to significant carbon emissions reductions to combat climate change.

The ‘Wind Power Works… Pass it on’ campaign involves downloading a virtual wind turbine onto users’ desktops to show their support for wind energy and deep emissions cuts. These turbines will demonstrate how many homes can be powered and how much CO2 can be saved through wind energy. The more wind turbines downloaded, the stronger the call to world leaders to agree the reductions necessary to avert climate change and to make wind energy part of the solution.

http://www.windpowerworks.net/pass_it_o ... hange.html

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The staggering growth of the global wind energy markets are being driven by a number of factors, including the wider context of energy supply and demand, the rising profile of environmental issues, especially climate change, and the impressive improvements of the technology itself.

Environmental concerns
The science is clear: if we are to avoid the worst ravages of climate change, global emissions need to start declining before 2020.

The power sector is not the only culprit when it comes to climate change, but it is the largest source of emissions, accounting for about 40% of CO2 and 25% of overall emissions.

Wind energy is the only power generation technology that will be able to make a substantial difference in CO2 emissions in the crucial timeframe up to 2020. It is quick to install, and on track to saving 10 billion tons of CO2 by 2020.

Security of Supply
Global demand for energy is increasing at a breathtaking pace, which will require significant investment in new power generation capacity and grid infrastructure. Just as energy demand continues to soar, supplies of fossil fuels are dwindling and prices are at their most volatile.

Wind energy, however, is a massive indigenous power source with is available virtually everywhere in the world. There are no fuel costs, no geo-political risk and no supply import dependency.

Economic considerations
Wind energy makes sound economic sense . In contrast to other generation sources, the price for the fuel needed over the total lifetime of a wind turbine is well known: it is zero. This takes away a substantial part of the investor’s risk.

At many sites, wind power is already competitive with new-built conventional technologies and in some cases much cheaper. When taking into account the price of carbon, wind power is even more attractive.

Job creation and regional economic development are also key factors in economic considerations around wind power.
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Re: Here comes our local windfarm

Postby Bruce Everiss » Sat 15 Aug 2009 8:22 am

Here is a great website with loads of factual information about wind farms. Not the alarmist NIMBY rantings: http://www.windpower.org/en/core.htm

For instance:

Shadow Casting from Wind Turbines http://www.windpower.org/en/tour/env/shadow/index.htm

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Wind turbines, like other tall structures will cast a shadow on the neighbouring area when the sun is visible. If you live very close to the wind turbine, it may be annoying if the rotor blades chop the sunlight, causing a flickering (blinking) effect while the rotor is in motion.
A bit of careful planning, and the use of good software to plan your wind turbine site can help you resolve this problem, however. If you know where the potential flicker effect is of a certain size, you may be able to place the turbines to avoid any major inconvenience for the neighbours.
Few Rules
Shadow casting is generally not regulated explicitly by planning authorities. In Germany, however, there has been a court case in which the judge tolerated 30 hours of actual shadow flicker per year at a certain neighbour's property. In the 30 hours, it appears, one should only include flicker which occur during the hours where the property is actually used by people (who are awake).
Predicting Shadow Flicker
Fortunately, we are able to predict quite accurately the probability of when and for how long there may be a flicker effect. We may not know in advance whether there is wind, or what the wind direction is, but using astronomy and trigonometry we can compute either a likely, or a "worst case" scenario, i.e. a situation where there is always sunshine, when the wind is blowing all the time, and when the wind and the turbine rotor keep tracking the sun by yawing the turbine exactly as the sun moves.
Figuring out the exact shape, place, and time of the shadow from a wind turbine requires a lot of computation, but at least one professional wind software programme can do this very accurately, even in hilly terrain, and with house windows of any size, shape, location and inclination facing in any direction.
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Re: Here comes our local windfarm

Postby Bruce Everiss » Sat 15 Aug 2009 9:32 am

Do you want this man telling us what to do?

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Unless we do something quick (like a wind farm in rural Warwickshire) we will be reliant on Russian gas to make our electricity.

And the Russians are very happy to turn off gas supplies for political reasons. Just ask the Ukraine.
And they are fast to flex their muscle in other states. Just ask Georgia.

But if you like the idea of Russia telling us what to do, become a NIMBY.
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Re: Here comes our local windfarm

Postby Bruce Everiss » Sat 15 Aug 2009 9:57 am

And now to the matter that vexes NIMBYs most, house prices. Well there has been some academic research on the matter.
http://www.bwea.com/media/news/070328.html

A new report from the Royal Institute of Chartered Surveyors (RICS) and Oxford Brookes University has blown away another myth about wind farms – their impact on house prices. The research found no clear relationship between the proximity of wind farms and property prices, and suggested that this may be an urban myth with apparent changes in value disappearing when examined closely.

Chris Tomlinson, Director of Programme Strategy at BWEA commented:

“This new report is the third in as many years which reaffirms that there is no empirical evidence to demonstrate a direct link between operating wind farms and house prices. The report also takes a refreshing look at NIMBYism and tells us what we have known for some time - objections to wind farms are often found to be less about genuine local concerns and more about wider ideological issues, submitted from those who live hundreds of miles from the development site. In fact local people who live near operating wind farms are the strongest advocates of wind energy."

The study looked at transactions of residential property near wind farms at two locations in Cornwall, and found that while terraced and semi-detached houses within a mile of one of the wind farms were lower in value than similar houses at a distance of four miles, other factors influenced the devaluation: the houses in question were ex-Ministry of Defence properties and were less desirable.

The study found no change in property prices beyond one mile from the wind farms.

The RICS-Oxford Brookes research also referred to the findings of another extensive study conducted in the United States which showed that far from having a negative impact on value, property prices within a five mile radius of a wind farm appeared to rise above the regional average, suggesting that wind turbines actually had a positive effect on value.
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